From RomanceJunkies.com

Contemporary
Such a Girl
By Jennifer Wardrip
Sep 3, 2004 - 2:27:00 PM

Only a few authors can successfully mix chick-lit romance with the classics of the past. Karen Siplin proves with this remarkable story of SUCH A GIRL that it can be done. And in her hands, it is done very well.


Don't get the wrong idea. Siplin is no Jane Austen, and she doesn't try to rework the entire story line of Austen's PERSUASION in this book. But some of the basic premises are there 'reworked' for a modern woman trying to struggle in a modern-day world, balancing the emotions and everyday upheavals that occur to a woman who doesn't know exactly where she stands when it comes to being in love and loved.

Kendall "Ken" Stark believed that she did the right thing, the only practical thing, when she ended a dead-end relationship with Jack Sullivan nine years ago. After all, they were both African-American's in a world where just being a minority can be both a blessing and a curse. And all those years ago, Jack was heading nowhere. With seemingly no ambition to make a living beyond the odd-jobs every now and again, Kendall decided that Jack was not the man for her.

But now, all these years later, working in a successful hotel with more responsibility than she knows what to do with, Jack is back-and he's not the man she remembers him to be. Because Jack now owns Sullivan Brewery, and the five-bedroom house he just bought in New England isn't too shabby either.

It's not a good time for Jack to return to her life. She's in a dead-end relationship with a married man, she's spent too much time thinking about where she is in the scheme of life, where she's going, and she had no extra energy to spend on the man she once thought she'd love until the end of time.

Ms. Siplin has taken a basic premise, that of love, forgiveness, redemption, and self-inspection, and turned it into a story that you can't fit into one simple niche.

Part chick-lit, part comedy, part drama, SUCH A GIRL is a coming-of-age story for women of all ages. I highly recommend it, not just for its ability to make you think, but for the pleasure of reading about someone who is, more than anything, a woman living and loving in today's modern world.



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